By Clay Waters | August 18, 2016 | 10:12 AM EDT

The New York Times did its part for the Hillary Clinton campaign (and President Obama’s legacy) in Thursday’s edition, offering happy talk about lost coal jobs in Kentucky, skipping over some inconvenient facts that would cloud the pro-Democratic narrative, while another story bashing Donald Trump’s tax plan passed up a golden opportunity to revive Clinton’s infamous “dead broke” comment.

By Clay Waters | July 24, 2016 | 5:15 PM EDT

Ideological double standards on display in the New York Times: While it’s a “dangerous anachronism” for Republicans to appeal to conservatives when picking a vice presidential candidate, it’s apparently absolutely necessary for Democrats to appeal to liberals. The Times noted the distaste for Hillary's pick, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, among the left, but surprisingly also identified Kaine with the left. But it was all good for "the man of deep religious faith" -- and a perfect legislative rating from Planned Parenthood?

By Clay Waters | June 21, 2016 | 10:29 PM EDT

New York Times reporters Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Jennifer Steinhauer lamented the doomed legislative prospects for various gun-control bills in stories on Tuesday, tossing journalistic objectivity aside while all but weeping with the families of previous gun massacre victims. Stolberg’s profile piece, “Victims’ Families Watch as Gun Measures Stall,” was sodden with regret and bereft of objectivity, as shown from the first paragraph: "They are members of the Club Nobody Wants to Be a Part Of. And their numbers are growing."

By Clay Waters | June 7, 2016 | 8:25 AM EDT

The front of the National section of Monday’s New York Times featured two race-and-ethnicity-charged reports from Minnesota and Virginia, one trying to corrode confidence in three Islamic terrorist convictions of Somalis in Minnesota, the other on a “Racially Charged Fight” over granting blanket voting rights to felons in Virginia, a move expected to benefit the Democratic nominee in November. Reporting from Minneapolis, reporters Jack Healy and Matt Furber’s story gave credence to far-left conspiracy theories right in the headline in “Fair or ‘Conspiracy’? Trial Divides Somalis in Minneapolis," while Sheryl Gay Stolberg happily followed a felon-turned-voting rights activist around Virginia helping enroll Democrats to vote.

By Clay Waters | April 13, 2016 | 7:37 PM EDT

The New York Times marked the one-year anniversary of the death in Baltimore of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died of a spinal cord injury a week after being arrested. With a mayoral election and the trials of six police officers charged in Gray’s death looming in May, reporters John Eligon and Sheryl Gay Stolberg took a biased look back at last year’s looting and violence in Baltimore, praising Black Lives Matter and seemingly impatient with the fact that the cops held responsible (without evidence) for Gray's death had not been convicted yet.

By Clay Waters | November 4, 2015 | 12:02 PM EST

Republican and Tea Party favorite Matt Bevin easily won the Kentucky governor's race last night, to the surprise of New York Times reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg and her headline writers, who wondered if Bevin was a "loose cannon" who would risk the GOP "losing an opportunity" to pick up a seat.

By Clay Waters | October 12, 2015 | 9:56 PM EDT

Pushing every available emotional button, the New York Times and reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg used the anger and grief of two fathers to advocate for gun control with front-page placement in Sunday's edition: "Guns Took His Daughter; Anger Fuels His Crusade." Stolberg never even mentioned the Second Amendment while lamenting Virginia's "hostile" attitude toward gun control, and portrayed gun-rights advocates as potentially dangerous.

By Tom Blumer | September 10, 2015 | 1:16 AM EDT

The folks at the New York Times must believe not only that their reporters are entitled to inject their opinions into hard-news stories, but that they can also inject their own "facts." Oh, and they can change those facts at will over time to fit the circumstances.

Sheryl Gay Stolberg's Wednesday story about the city's $6.4 million settlement with the family of Freddie Gray appearing in Thursday's print edition is a perfect case in point. Stolberg recast events following Gray's death to claim that there was only one night of rioting, when there were clearly two — even though contemporaneous coverage at the Times itself identified two separate nights of riots.

By Kyle Drennen | June 8, 2015 | 3:53 PM EDT

As part of the Fox News Sunday political panel, New York Times reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg attempted to defend her paper’s hit piece on Marco Rubio but instead seemed to confirm the backlash against the Times: “When you run for president, every aspect of your life, and even your spouse's life, is open to public scrutiny....So this is kind of the game, right? This is what happens, this is why people don't run for president.”

By Tom Blumer | May 3, 2015 | 11:41 PM EDT

One could spend hours critiquing the horridly written, agenda-driven Friday evening (Saturday print edition, front page) story at the New York Times about Marilyn J. Mosby, the state’s attorney for Baltimore. On Friday, she announced the indictment of six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray.

Earlier Sunday, "Open Blogger" at the Ace of Spades blog provided the Cliff's notes version of the report by Sheryl Gay Stolberg and Alan Blinder — "exactly what one would expect from what is now the loudest national voice in support of mob rule." Especially egregious is the pair's strong implication, in the context of their writeup, that Mosby's cousin was killed by the police. It's hard to see how the average reader could reach any other conclusion after reading paragraphs 2 through 7 in their report (bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2015 | 10:53 AM EDT

At a Sunday press conference, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake told reporters that she and the law enforcement in the city she runs have a de facto responsibility, in the name of "balance," to give "space" to "destroy" to "protesters" who have such a desire.

This obviously newsworthy pull quote condoning property destruction is not present in coverage at the Associated Press's main national site, in several stories where her comment could have been mentioned at the wire service's "Big Story" site, or in two additional stories at the New York Times containing Sheryl Gay Stolberg's byline. Video and a transcript follow the jump.

By Clay Waters | January 14, 2015 | 11:55 AM EST

The New York Times' message to the new Republican congress? Don't cross Obama. That was the gist of three political stories on Wednesday. Sheryl Gay Stolberg's profile of grizzled Senate veteran John McCain included this harsh attack: "...despite hints that he is trying to reinvent himself from cantankerous Obama critic to elder statesman, Mr. McCain still seems to be in clobber mode."