By Tim Graham | August 17, 2016 | 7:37 PM EDT

USA Today put the latest troubling signs of private insurers bailing out of Obamacare on the top of the front page Wednesday. But something really obvious was missing from the text of the entire article – the name “Obama.” 

The headline for this beating-around-the-bush story was “Health care costs to rise in 2017: Aetna pullout in 11 states reflects insurance industry upheaval.”

By Sam Dorman | July 20, 2016 | 3:16 PM EDT

The 2016 Republican National Convention brought the radical, left-wing fringe out in Cleveland, and some of the groups’ ideas were downright ridiculous.

By Mike Ciandella | July 14, 2016 | 6:15 PM EDT

The Affordable Care Act crisis is continuing, but you wouldn’t know that if you relied on ABC, CBS or NBC for your news. On July 5, CNBC called Connecticut’s state co-op “financially unstable,” noting that “HealthyCT is the 14th of 23 original ObamaCare co-ops to fail since they began selling health plans on government-run Affordable Care Act insurance exchanges.” A few days later, on July 8, Oregon’s co-op became the 15th to fail. Illinois followed on July 12.

By P.J. Gladnick | July 11, 2016 | 8:53 PM EDT

He voted for the bill before he was (sort of) against it.

Today much of the mainstream media jumped for joy when announcing that the Democrat Senate nominee in Indiana, Baron Hill, would step aside in favor of former Senator Evan Bayh to once again run for his old seat. Missing in all the happiness was any mention that Bayh, whose Senate career was rather undistinguished except for being the crucial 60th vote that made Obamacare possible, subsequently voiced extreme dissatisfaction with that same bill. Perhaps Bayh and the MSM hope that Bayh's radically shifting attitude would be sent down the memory hole but let us review some of the former senator's comments on this topic once he thought he no longer had to face the voters. Perhaps the most bizarre of the reasons he gave for his Obamacare vote which he later came close to recanting was so as not to see smug Republican faces as related in the New York Times:

By Tim Graham | May 12, 2016 | 10:27 AM EDT

James Taranto at The Wall Street Journal had some fun with President Obama earlier in the week, matching headlines: “Obama Makes Case Against Donald Trump, Saying Presidency ‘Is Not a Reality Show’ ”—headline, New York Times, May 7, vs. “Barack Obama and Bryan Cranston on the Roles of a Lifetime”—headline, New York Times, May 8.

By Geoffrey Dickens | May 10, 2016 | 12:03 PM EDT

On Monday’s edition of PBS’s Charlie Rose show the host invited on former Obama speechwriters David Litt, Jon Favreau and Jon Lovett to wax fondly about Obama’s “great” communication skills when it came to delivering both serious speeches and funny lines. When Lovett, now a writer in Hollywood, told Rose he was most proud of the “serious speeches” on the economy and health care, Favreau jokingly jabbed that Lovett was responsible for the now infamous lie about keeping your health insurance plan. Rose and the entire panel cracked up at the line.

By Kristine Marsh | May 2, 2016 | 8:54 PM EDT

Americans think the economy and ObamaCare are terrible because of Republicans’ “negative advertising” according to MSNBC and The New York Times. Monday night’s Hardball with Chris Matthews held a discussion between the host and Times’ reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin, where they echoed President Obama’s sentiment that Americans only thought badly about the economy and ObamaCare because of the GOP’s negative messaging.

By Jorge Bonilla | April 22, 2016 | 12:24 PM EDT

Sesgo por omisión.Tell the Truth 2016

By Jorge Bonilla | April 22, 2016 | 10:21 AM EDT

Earlier this week, United Healthcare made major news by announcing its intent to pull out of Obamacare. The story mostly went missing from all but one domestic Spanish-language network

By Tom Johnson | April 12, 2016 | 6:05 PM EDT

There’s a crucial difference between the Loch Ness Monster and any Republican health-care-reform plan worthy of the name: Nessie almost certainly does not exist, but the GOP plan cannot exist. That, essentially, was the message of a Monday blog post by New York magazine’s Chait.

“It is impossible to design a health-care plan that is both consistent with conservative ideology and acceptable to the broader public,” asserted Chait. “People who can’t afford health insurance are either unusually sick…unusually poor…or both…You can cover poor people by giving them money. And you can cover sick people by requiring insurers to sell plans to people regardless of age or preexisting conditions. Obamacare uses both of these methods. But Republicans oppose spending more money on the poor, and they oppose regulation, which means they don’t want to do either of them.”

By Tom Johnson | March 30, 2016 | 8:39 PM EDT

“I’ve made up my mind -- don’t confuse me with the facts” could be Republicans’ unofficial motto when it comes to Obamacare, suggested New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait in a Tuesday post concerning decreased growth in health-care costs.

Chait asserted that “some aspects of the lower health-care-inflation rate can be clearly tied to Obamacare reforms,” though he allowed that “it’s impossible to know just what proportion of credit the law deserves for the lower inflation rate.” His main point, however, was that statistical analysis regarding the effects of the ACA is irrelevant to hyperideological GOPers: “It’s obvious that no conceivable data can falsify conservative opposition to Obamacare. The premise that Obamacare has failed is a matter of doctrinal writ, as holy as the sanctity of the great Ronald Reagan."

By Ken Shepherd | March 23, 2016 | 5:01 PM EDT

According to the Daily Beast's Jay Michaelson, not only is the lawsuit against the Obama administration over the contraceptive mandate based on "tortured logic," it's sinful.