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Appearing as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy, MSNBC contributor and Newsweek senior editor Kurt Eichenwald accused Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Republican members of Congress of defending "right-wing terrorists" during the Obama administration, as the liberal journalist tried to implicate mainstream conservatives in recent reports of hate crimes. Eichenwald: "In order to attack Obama. they said conservatives are right-wing terrorists. They told these right-wing extremists, 'You are one of us.'"


On Friday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion in which panel members fretted over Republican reaction to GOP Rep.-elect Greg Gianforte violently attacking a reporter, The Atlantic's David Frum managed to inject race into the discussion as he theorized about what Rush Limbaugh would have done if Gianforte were a black Democrat. Frum: "Had the congressman been a black Democrat, imagine what Rush Limbaugh would have said. Rush Limbaugh called the attack 'studly' and 'manly.' Imagine -- it would have -- you would have had an explosion of racial provocation."

 


MSNBC host Rachel Maddow may be an object of mockery, even among her liberal media colleagues, for breathlessly hyping (and then endlessly milking) a “big scoop” about Donald Trump’s tax returns Tuesday night. The big leak turned out to be a two-page 1040 form from 2005, showing that Trump paid $38 million in income taxes that year. Even Slate headlined it a “Cynical, Self-Defeating Spectacle.”


Yes, you read that headline correctly. Leading off his eponymous talk radio show on Wednesday, conservative stalwart Rush Limbaugh lambasted MSNBC host Rachel Maddow and “lunatic” far-left journalist David Cay Johnston over the pathetic release of President Trump’s 2005 tax returns, declaring “they got schlonged” and blinded by their hatred for Trump.

 


Monday morning on CNN’s New Day, hosts Chris Cuomo and Alisyn Camerota spoke with media correspondent Brian Stelter and analyst Bill Carter about Trump’s claims that he was wire-tapped by President Obama. The CNN panel took the opportunity to not just bash Trump but also blast the “illegitimate” and “partisan” right-wing sources where Trump gets his news.


Opening his program on Monday, Rush Limbaugh referred to a Politico item by Hanna Trudo, who reported on his appearance on the February 19 edition of Fox News Sunday. Trudo opened by claiming that "Rush Limbaugh says he doesn’t buy the notion that Russia influenced the election of President Donald Trump." Rush observed on the air that this isn't what he said. Then Trudo doubled down and incorrectly "quote," using quotation marks, what Rush allegedly said. Both the video and the show's transcript demonstrate that Rush did not say what Trudo claimed. Her misquote distorts what he said. And the establishment press wonders why the average American distrusts and despises them.


In a hilarious case of irony, The 11th Hour host and serial liar Brian Williams teed up guest Charlie Sykes on Tuesday to lambaste conservative media (like the one you’re reading) for being why no one trusts mainstream media in the age of Trump and alternative facts. 


New York Times Emily Badger dominates all of page 3 of Thursday’s print paper, with “Immigrant Shock: California Offers Hint of Nation’s Future,” a long “Upshot” analysis operating under the unspoken assumption that Donald Trump voters were prejudiced and skitterish of different-looking people invading their neighborhood. She even roped Rush Limbaugh’s 1980’s Sacramento radio show into her essay as a marker of racist anti-immigrant hostility.


Would an Attorney General Jeff Sessions wreck civil rights? Several newspapers seem to think so, including Monday’s New York Times, which tried to poison the well against him as his confirmation looms. The long front-page profile of Sen. Sessions of Alabama, Donald Trump’s pick for attorney general, hid its hostility and labeling slant under the benign headline, “Bonding by Bucking the Establishment.”


In the mid-1990s, when the great Norm Macdonald was kicking off his “Weekend Update” segments of Saturday Night Live with, “And now, the fake news,” pretty much everyone knew what he meant. These days, however, disputes over definitions of “fake news” seem as common as fake news itself. It may be that the lefty writer angriest about fake news is media critic and political blogger Allison Hantschel, who in a Tuesday post at First Draft blamed the problem on both conservative media (for undermining the mainstream media) and the MSM (for not vigorously defending itself until it was too late).


Late Thursday afternoon, the Media Research Center’s Tim Graham appeared on the Fox Business Network (FBN) program After the Bell to slam the media for their double standard in reacting to President Barack Obama’s media criticism versus whenever President-elect Donald Trump does the same. FBN host David Asman set the scene with a quote from an Atlantic interview in which President Obama’s offered his latest attack on conservative media, Fox News, and Rush Limbaugh. 


Though the press apparently wants everyone to forget about it, the fact is that barely two weeks ago, over Thanksgiving weekend, the Obama administration told the world, apparently only through the New York Times, its designated mouthpiece, that "we stand behind our (nation's) election results, which accurately reflect the will of the American people."

The statement was "issued" to the Times on Friday, November 25, and was provided, according to the paper, "on the condition that it be attributable only to a senior official." Just 14 days later, on Friday evening, December 9, the Washington Post published its claim of "a secret assessment that Russia intervened in the 2016 election to help Donald Trump win the presidency." Why should anyone believe that the intelligence landscape concerning Russia's actions changed so quickly in two weeks?