By Clay Waters | August 18, 2016 | 10:12 AM EDT

The New York Times did its part for the Hillary Clinton campaign (and President Obama’s legacy) in Thursday’s edition, offering happy talk about lost coal jobs in Kentucky, skipping over some inconvenient facts that would cloud the pro-Democratic narrative, while another story bashing Donald Trump’s tax plan passed up a golden opportunity to revive Clinton’s infamous “dead broke” comment.

By Curtis Houck | August 17, 2016 | 10:16 PM EDT

Always one of the more egregious liberal pundits in dismissing Clinton scandals, MSNBC’s Joy Reid filled in for Chris Hayes on Wednesday’s All In and sought to imply that since Breitbart News chief executive and now Trump campaign chief executive Steve Bannon helped fund the organization that allowed Peter Schweizer to write Clinton Cash, the book’s claims are not just “false” but reckless. 

By Randy Hall | August 17, 2016 | 6:39 PM EDT

During a guest appearance on Tuesday's edition of MSNBC's Morning Joe program, Cokie Roberts -- a political commentator for National Public Radio and ABC News -- hammered people who still support Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as “morally tainted” and an example of “textbook racism.”

Roberts said of the approximately 40 percent of American voters who polls say still support Trump: “I mean, there’s just no question about that. You can’t say ‘He’s a racist and what he says is textbook racism, but I support him because he’s the nominee of my party.’”

By Clay Waters | August 17, 2016 | 4:02 PM EDT

The New York Times “Interpreter” column is a recent addition to the paper’s news pages. Sold as a philosophical fact-check, it comes off as an excuse to sneak yet more liberal opinion into the paper under the guise of offering an elevated perspective on current events. Most egregious yet: Wednesday’s column by Amanda Taub, in which she goes to ludicrous lengths to wave away the problem of the threat of sexual assault by Islamic migrants and denigrate conservative critics of the assaults: “Portraying Muslims as a Threat to Women, Donald Trump Echoes ‘Us vs. Them’ Refrain.” Taub’s text is even worse, as she offensively compares valid concerns about Islamic refugee sexual violence and refugee attitudes toward women in general to Jim Crow and the lynching days

By Sam Dorman | August 17, 2016 | 3:43 PM EDT

NBC Chairman Bob Greenblatt slammed presidential candidate Donald Trump, calling him "toxic" and "demented," after his network spend more than a decade building his image. In a Facebook post he later deleted, Greenblatt lamented the “sad state of affairs” created by “pompous businessman turned reality TV star” Donald Trump. 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | August 17, 2016 | 12:25 AM EDT

In what many on Tuesday called “an extremely rare step,” the FBI handed over their notes and other documents pertaining to their investigation of Secretary Hillary Clinton’s private e-mail server to Congress. Also on Tuesday, rumors swirled that Donald Trump was seeking debate advice from the former Chair of Fox News Rodger Ailes. While CBS and NBC dedicated almost equal time to both stories, the superficial ABC dedicated more than twice the time to Trump’s debate prep. 

By Tom Johnson | August 16, 2016 | 11:33 PM EDT

As you probably know, Sean Hannity and The Wall Street Journal’s Bret Stephens recently sniped at each other regarding Donald Trump. Those hostilities, suggested Zack Beauchamp in a Monday piece, were more on the level of an NFL intrasquad game than, say, Steelers vs. Ravens in the playoffs. Beauchamp argues that Hannity and Stephens, whatever their differences over the GOP nominee, have something much more important in common: a “conservative worldview, defined by a widespread acceptance of unsupportable ideas, that helped give rise to Trump.”

By Edgard Portela | August 16, 2016 | 9:37 PM EDT

Fiel a su patrón de cobertura consistentemente anti-Trump, ahora Univisión se está enfocando en la historia de Melania Trump como inmigrante a los EE.UU., convirtiéndola en su tema de noticias más importante en el programa semanal, Al Punto.

By P.J. Gladnick | August 16, 2016 | 8:22 PM EDT

Donny Deutsch has a big fear about an impending jihadist attack. He is worried that jihadists would instigate terrorism because they supposedly think it would help Donald Trump win. He made this assertion not once but twice on With All Due Respect.  Deutsch begins worrying about a Trump victory due to jihadists at the 1:10 mark of the following video.

 

By Randy Hall | August 16, 2016 | 4:59 PM EDT

As this year's presidential campaign moves ever closer to the first debate on Monday, September 26, at Hofstra University in Long Island, New York, Hillary Clinton's team is facing a difficult challenge: finding a person who can stand in as Donald Trump during mock debates and launch personal attacks on the former secretary of state that will make the real Republican candidate look tame by comparison.

In an article posted on Tuesday by Annie Karni, a politics reporter for the Politico website, the person “picked to be Hillary Clinton's sparring partner in her upcoming debate prep sessions is expected to confront her” about “out-Trumping Trump,” which “is an inherently awkward enterprise, one which is expected to unfold only in front of a small group of trusted aides.”

By P.J. Gladnick | August 16, 2016 | 2:14 PM EDT

3000! Do I see 3000? Yup! My biased lenses allows me to see 3000 people attending the Hillary Clinton speech in Scranton, Pennsylvania yesterday where Vice President Joe Biden also made an appearance.

 The funny thing about the election campaign so far is how few 360 degree visuals we get of the campaign crowds so the public can actually gauge the turnout for themselves. Your humble correspondent was at a Donald Trump speech last Wednesday at the BB&T Center in the Fort Lauderdale area and it was completely filled up except for the nosebleed rafters which were closed off to the public.

By Tom Blumer | August 16, 2016 | 11:48 AM EDT

One of the press's favorite current themes is how Donald Trump's presence at the top of the Republican general-election ticket in the fall has the potential to hurt Republican candidates in Senate and congressional races. That may well be, but the Democrats appear to have a more serious and far more intractable problem which those in the establishment press, including Steve Peoples at the Associated Press Tuesday morning, have mostly chosen to ignore. Down-ticket Dems are saddled with presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's low marks from voters on honesty and trustworthiness.