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The controversy over Kathy Griffin holding up a bloodied severed head of Donald Trump — an action which has led to her removal from CNN's New Year's Eve programming — reportedly spilled into the President's family when TMZ reported that the Trumps' 11-year son "Barron was in front of the TV watching a show when the news came on and he saw the bloody, beheaded image." TMZ says: "We're told he panicked and screamed, 'Mommy, Mommy!'"


The Associated Press, PolitiFact, CNN, Snopes and all of the other "fact-checkers" should be busy this weekend and well into next week vetting the howlers contained in Rebecca Traister's New York Magazine Friday afternoon interview of a politician who has been in the public eye for decades. But it's a virtual lock that they won't bother, because the person Traister interviewed was Hillary Clinton.


At NBC and Newsweek, it's still the late-1960s. The movie Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?, with its then-edgy portrayal of an engaged interracial couple visiting the white fiancee's parents, has recently debuted. Apparently the ink hasn't yet dried on the Supreme Court's Loving vs. Virginia decision, which nullified all remaining interracial marriage bans. What else can possibly explain the breathtakingly ignorant tweets emanating from those two media outlets acting as if America might not be ready for the idea that Rachel Lindsay, the first black woman in the history of The Bachelorette, might end up getting engaged to someone of another race?


After a turbulent week in American politics where controversial stories about President Trump’s administration were broken by newspapers with long-standing histories bias, NBC spent some time on Sunday Today championing a relative newcomer to “the game.” “But this national moment has brought some new players into the game as well,” touted host Willie Geist. “NBC's Katy Tur shines our Sunday spotlight on a publication you never would have associated with politics until now.” That newcomer is fashion magazine Teen Vogue


Time Magazine's May 29 cover features a purported parody of the U.S. White House turning red and well towards being transformed into what the illustrator believes is "the Kremlin." This is supposed to show just how creative and conscientious these folks are. What it really shows is the opposite.


Desperate to make a case that voter-ID laws kept "many" people who should be allowed to vote from casting ballots in Wisconsin in November, two reporters at the Associated Press claimed "it is not hard to find" examples of Badger State residents who were "turned away." Left unexplained is how reporters Christina A. Cassidy and Ivan Moreno apparently could only identify four people out of hundreds of thousands allegedly affected after six months of searching. Despite a headline claiming that those involved faced "insurmountable" barriers, each person cited could have successfully cast a ballot, but failed to do so because of inadequate follow-through.


The Associated Press had a variety of howlers from Democrats and leftists it could have included in its May 8 (update on May 9) "fact check" roundup based on events of the past week. As those who have watched the wire service's conduct since the 2016 election campaign could have predicted, it included none, and instead solely went after the Trump administration and GOP politicians on nine different claims.


Our recurring joke - that is itself a ceaselessly recurring joke - is when we mention the “Media-Left,” we always follow it with “please pardon the redundancy.”  The Media-Left merger is now seamless.  I could hand you a New York Times article and a Daily Kos article - and you would be hard pressed to determine which is which (aside from the latter’s propensity for profanity).

As Rush Limbaugh repeatedly points out - the Media are the horse, the Left merely the cart the Media drags along behind.  And the Democrat Party is the inert, inept product in the cart - dragged along by both.  

 


Early Thursday morning, New York Magazine published an online item which claimed that "rape is a pre-existing condition" under the health care bill which has passed in the House. As Reason.com noted, "None of this is true. Like, not even a little bit." That appears not to be the point, though. The point of engaging in such irresponsibility appears to have been to get it out there so that at least some people who never learn about the "correction" end up believing the original false claims. In other words, it's shamelessly produced fake news.


In an 18-minute Friday interview on the New Yorker Radio Hour, CNN President Jeffrey Zucker contended that "Fox News ... is state-run TV," that "MSNBC has become the opposition," and that "CNN is seeking the truth." Yes, he really said that. Zucker also doesn't like the term "fake news" any more — even though his network was one of the earliest post-election promoters of the term when they thought they could use it as a club against others.


On Friday (appearing in Saturday's print edition), the New York Times published its first column by Bret Stephens, the former Wall Street Journal columnist recently hired as a "conservative" voice. Its theme was that the political "hyperbole" about climate change doesn't match the underlying science — even if one trusts the underlying science. That alone was enough to send journalists into unhinged and often profane orbit.


On the day after Earth Day's "March for Science," it seems appropriate to point to a column by University of Michigan History Professor Juan Cole in The Nation, a far-far-left publication considered a credible and authoritative go-to-source by the liberal intelligentsia. On April 18, Cole, echoing statements made during their final years in power by Barack Obama and his administration's officials with establishment press acquiescence, nonsensically claimed that Syria's biggest problem during the past decade has been ... carbon dioxide. Hardly.