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On Sunday in London, CNN's Becky Anderson and an accompanying camera crew were captured by another videographer appearing to stage an anti-ISIS protest by a small group equipped with printed signs. CNN has denied staging the event, claiming that it "simply filmed" those involved, but it's clear that the affair was at the very least quite orchestrated and agenda-driven.


MSNBC's Richard Lui appears to be testing the limits of irresponsible media coverage of terrorist incidents. Up until now, the press has fretted in the aftermath of such attacks about possible retaliations or "backlash" against Muslims or others not involved in them, even though such misguided revenge-seeking has rarely occurred. Saturday evening, Lui worried about police "overreacting" shortly after terror attacks in London which, as of the time of this post, had taken the lives of seven innocents and injured 48 others, including 21 critically.


The controversy over Kathy Griffin holding up a bloodied severed head of Donald Trump — an action which has led to her removal from CNN's New Year's Eve programming — reportedly spilled into the President's family when TMZ reported that the Trumps' 11-year son "Barron was in front of the TV watching a show when the news came on and he saw the bloody, beheaded image." TMZ says: "We're told he panicked and screamed, 'Mommy, Mommy!'"


Seth Borenstein's Saturday dispatch at the Associated Press on how it "Doesn’t look good for Earth" if the United States under President Trump "quits" the 2015 Paris climate is about as fakey as fake news gets. It's also sloppy and inconsistent in its terminology, and misleading about the nature and timing of what former President Obama's pledge would require the U.S. to do — while letting expanding greenhouse gas emitters like China off the hook.


Memorial Day media coverage didn't seem to have many lowlights this year. One glaring exception: Vox.com's decision to publish Alex Ward's hit piece going after the U.S. Marine Corps and its alleged culture of "toxic masculinity" on the one day set aside every year to honor all military men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice.


On Tuesday, Randy Hall at NewsBusters covered how "the Associated Press hired a 'freelancer' -- who turned out to be 'a hardcore left-wing activist' -- to attend a 'closed press' fund-raiser for the GOP in New Hampshire." In other words, the wire service sent Melanie Plenda to the event for the express purpose of crashing it, despite the NHGOP's clear instructions. It turns out that the Washington Post's Erik Wemple, in covering the fallout from Plenda's sneaky, sloppy work, is perfectly fine with that.


At NBC and Newsweek, it's still the late-1960s. The movie Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?, with its then-edgy portrayal of an engaged interracial couple visiting the white fiancee's parents, has recently debuted. Apparently the ink hasn't yet dried on the Supreme Court's Loving vs. Virginia decision, which nullified all remaining interracial marriage bans. What else can possibly explain the breathtakingly ignorant tweets emanating from those two media outlets acting as if America might not be ready for the idea that Rachel Lindsay, the first black woman in the history of The Bachelorette, might end up getting engaged to someone of another race?


When it comes to "news" which might discredit Donald Trump or a member of his family, the modus operandi for too many in the press is, "Tweet and report first, ask questions later (if at all)." On Sunday, several media members couldn't resist falsely tweeting that Ivanka Trump will somehow control $100 million pledged by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to a World Bank fund for women entrepreneurs, thus dishonestly opening the door to utterly false parallels to the Clinton family-controlled Clinton Foundation.


On May 12, California Governor Jerry Brown, during a visit to that state's Orange County, said, "The freeloaders — I’ve had enough of them." His statement came during what the Orange County Register called "an impassioned defense" of the state's recently passed "road-improvement plan. The "freeloaders" he targeted with his remark are the state's taxpayers, those who wish to recall a tax-supporting legislator, and Republicans involved in putting the tax on November ballot. The rest of California's press, as well as key national press outlets, have not taken note of Brown's remark.


Time Magazine's May 29 cover features a purported parody of the U.S. White House turning red and well towards being transformed into what the illustrator believes is "the Kremlin." This is supposed to show just how creative and conscientious these folks are. What it really shows is the opposite.


In a Tuesday post at the American Enterprise Institute's "AEI Ideas" blog, Marc Thiessen called out "The media hypocrisy over Trump’s intelligence leak." While acknowledging that the Trump-related leak, if true (very big if), would be "indeed a disaster" — though, as National Review's Andy McCarthy has noted, still within Trump's unreviewable authority" as President —Thiessen noted that the current hyperventilation is coming from "the same news outlets that regularly, and intentionally, published highly classified intelligence in recent years, based on leaks from the Obama administration."


Last week was a very bad week for the establishment press, and for the leftist politicians who can't resist repeating and relaying the media's questionable "news" its journalists have been reporting as if they are clearly established facts. But you wouldn't know it from the Associated Press, which, consistent with its practice during many previous weeks, directed all eleven of its "fact-checking" efforts to statements made by President Donald Trump or members of his administration.